7 Types Of Wasps In North America (With Pictures)

Wasps can be found all over the world, except Antarctica. Wasps can identify another by identifying them from their distinctive facial features.

There are more than 30,000 kinds of wasps. If you are ever shivering when you see a wasp soaring through your party at the pool, instead of taking out the fly swatter, try contemplating these fascinating facts about wasps. Wasps are present everywhere except Antarctica.

Wasps can recognize other wasps by identifying the individual by their distinctive facial features. There are more than 30,000 recognized kinds of wasps. Wasps can make their papers to build their nests using chewing and throwing out pieces of bark. Only females are stingers.

The stingers are modified organs for egg-laying. Wasps can be found in every color you can imagine, including green, red, orange, blue, black, and yellow. Wasps have shown to be adept at reasoning. They can use two distinct sources of information to come to an inference. But, wasps are also important ecologically and economically. Wasps are involved in pollinating flowers and crops.

7 Types Of Wasps In North America



1. Bald-faced Hornets

Bald-faced Hornets
Bald-faced Hornets

The Bald-faced Hornet is a North American insect that builds an enormous paper nest to accommodate an entire social group. Its bald-faced body Hornet is black, and its face is white. Soft-bodied insects like caterpillars and aphids are popular foods.

The hairy Hornet is bald-faced and ranges in size from 34 of an inch up to just one-quarter of an inch. Hornets with bald faces often construct their huge nests of paper in places where people reside and work or play. The habitat of the bald-faced Hornet is located in forests and urban areas with vegetation.



2. European Hornets

European Hornets
European Hornets

The European Hornet (Vespa bro) is the biggest wasp with a eusocial habitat in Europe. Their bodies are brown and have a yellow stripe on their abdomens.

European Hornets are mostly carnivores that hunt huge insects, such as wasps, beetles, large dragonflies, moths, and mantises. European hornets can grow as much as one inch (25 millimeters) long, while queens can reach 1.3 inches.

European Hornets hunt for natural caves at least 6 feet above the ground. European Hornets are commonly located in forests and other adjacent regions.

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3. Mud Dauber Wasps

Mud Dauber Wasps
Mud Dauber Wasps

Mud dauber is the common term used to describe a wasp that creates its nest out of the mud. Mud daubers are found all over North America. Mud daubers are typically black, but they could be white or blue metallic luster.

Adult Mud daubers eat honeydew, plant nectar, and body fluids derived that they take on. Adult mud daubers reach an extremely large size, ranging from 1 1/2 to 2 inches long.

They are beneficial insects because they decrease the number of spiders. The yellow and black wasps that eat mud are often found in flower gardens or puddles, searching for dirt.



4. Paper Wasps

Paper Wasps
Paper Wasps

“Paper wasp” is the name given to various species of wasps that belong to the Polistes sub-family. They’re mostly brown, with some yellow coloring. Adult paper wasps mostly consume nectar or other sugary solutions, such as honeydew, as well as juices from mature fruits.

They measure 1.9 to 3.2 centimeters long. In winter, most paper wasps perish, except queens newly born. They are social insects that create small, paper-like nests that are grey in plants and trees.

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5. Yellow Jackets

Yellow Jackets
Yellow Jackets

Yellowjackets are characterized by a smooth stinger, which means they could have more than one string and can be quite painful. Yellow Jackets Yellow Jacket is a North American predatory insect that constructs an enormous colony nest.

Yellowjackets are distinguished by their distinctive black and yellow stripes zigzag across their entire body, from the head to the abdomen. Yellowjackets are carnivores, predominantly eating other insects such as insects like flies and bees.

A typical yellowjacket is around 12 millimeters (0.47 in) in length. Yellowjackets make nests inside trees, shrubs, or even in protected areas like inside structures constructed by humans. The nests are usually built beneath the ground, in garbage areas and dark, cool areas.



6. Ground Digger Wasp

Ground Digger Wasp
Ground Digger Wasp

Ground digger isps are unique insects that don’t rely on nesting colonies or nesting with others. They’re predominantly black, having yellow-colored stripes across their abdomens along with translucent yellow wings.

Adult digger wasps eat nectar from flowers, but they also possess the kill tactics of predators. With a size of about 2 inches long and a weight between 0.7-1.5 0.75 oz (12-32g).

They dig approximately six inches deep into the soil to construct their nest. Typically, they are found in open fields or prairie ranges.

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7. Carpenter Bee

Carpenter Bee
Carpenter Bee

Carpenter bees look similar in size and appearance to bumblebees. Carpenter bees are a bare and shiny abdomen, which is all black. Similar to honey bees, Carpenter bees eat nectar and pollen.

Females are 5/8-inch long. Carpenter bees hibernate in empty nests in winter. Carpenter bees are attracted to unpainted and weathered wood, particularly soft species like cedar, redwood, cypress and pine.

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