9 Types Of Bees In Northern California (With Pictures)

Bees have lived for about thirty million years! They carry their pollen around on hind limbs in the form of a corbicula or a basket for pollen. Foragers need to gather nectar from approximately 2 million flowers to create 1 one pound of honey.

A typical forager produces around 1/12th of 1 teaspoon of honey over her life. The median per capita of love consumed across the US is 1.3 pounds. Bees have two pairs of wings. The most common method of communication between honey bees involves chemicals known as pheromones.

Bees are significant since they pollinate around 130 crops of agriculture in the US, including fiber, fruit nuts, nuts, and vegetables. Many people have noticed that dictionaries have “honeybee” as one word. However, entomologists employ the two-word name convention “honey bee.” Both are true! Bees see faces just like we do.

They take individual parts–like eyebrows, lips, and ears, and then put them to form the entire face. This is referred to as configural processing, and it could aid computer researchers in improving facial identification technology. The New York Times says. Serial killers are as bees.

They commit crimes near their homes; however, they are far enough to be concerned about neighbors. Bees also collect pollen close to their hives.

However, they are far enough away that predators cannot find the beehive. To better understand the way the “buffer zone” works, scientists looked into the behavior of bees and formulated a few algorithms. Their research helped improve computer models used by police to identify felons.



1. Digger bee, Anthophora spp. (Apidae)

Digger Bees
Digger Bees

Also called ground bees, digger bees are bees that nest in the ground. Based on the species, they can be metallic or dark and often have white, yellow or rust color of their markings.

Adult bees drink nectar and consume pollen, while larvae consume honey, pollen, pollen, and floral oils. Digger bees measure 1/4 to 1/2 inches long. Digger bee colonies are usually found in areas where mulch and grass are stricken.



2. Mason Bee, Osmia (Megachilidae)

Mason Bee
Mason Bee

Mason bee is the name that is now used to describe a species of bees belonging to the Genus Osmia belonging to the family of Megachilidae. They are black and have an iridescent dark blue sheen.

They consume nectar and pollen throughout their lives as they hunt. They range from approximately 3/8 to 5/8 inches in length. Mason bees lay eggs in small natural holes, such as holes for woodpeckers, insects, or hollow branches. They are often found in urban environments, including parks and gardens.



3. Valley carpenter bee ,Xylocopa varipuncta (Apidae)

Valley carpenter bee
Valley carpenter bee

They are also known as the Valley Carpenters, are the largest bees found in California. The Carpenter bees are similar in size and appearance to Bumblebees, and carpenter bees do not consume wood but eat pollen from plants and nectar.

They grow to about one inch (2.5 millimeters) long. They are the Valley Carpenter Bee. Valley Carpenter Bee is native to the Southwestern U.S. from California to Texas and south to northern Baja California, Mexico.

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4. Leafcutter bee, Megachile spp. (Megachilidae)

Leafcutter bee
Leafcutter bee

Leafcutting bees are among the most important native pollinators in North America. Male Leafcutter Bees are very modified feet and have numerous dark marks. They are attracted by pollen sources, nectar, nesting sites, water, and construction materials.

The majority of leafcutting bees are around the same size as a honeybee and range from 5 to 24 millimeters. Similar to mason bees, they are also known as cavity-nesting. Leafcutter Bees are found in urban areas and forests, heaths, woodlands.



5. Long-horned Bee, Melissodes spp. (Apidae)

Long-Horned Bee
Long-Horned Bee

The Long-horned Bee is one of the biggest solitary bees. Long-horned bees tend to be big and hairy with hind legs that are hairy to collect pollen. They feed and sleep on the edge of blooms such as this false sunflower.

The long-horned bee typically measures 9 to 15 millimeters in length and has yellowish wings. They are solitary; however, some species create nesting aggregations within the soil. Their habitat comprises grasslands along the coast, soft cliff faces, heathland edges, woodland rides, and clearings.



6. Manicatum Anthidium (Megachilidae)

Manicatum Anthidium
Manicatum Anthidium

Anthidium manicatum, more commonly referred to as”the European wool-carrier bee, is one of the species of bees in the family of Megachilidae. While most bees are hairy, wool bees have a shiny, slick appearance.

Females like to gather fibers from fuzzy plants, such as Lamb ‘s-ear and the Great Mullein, as well as Yarrow. Wool carder bees are larger bees, between 11 and 17 millimeters, about the same size as a honeybee.

It is most admired because of its distinctive and aggressive mating patterns. They will nest in cavities or holes, including hollowed stems, deadwood, and human-made structures. They are found in woodland rides, heathland and clearings, wetlands, and rivers.

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7. Mining bees, Andrena spp. (Apidae)

Mining Bees
Mining Bees

Mining bees comprise 450 bee native species in North America in the Adrenid Genus. Mining bees have medium-sized (honey-bee-sized) insects, most of which can be observed at the beginning of the year.

As with other bees, they consume nectar and pollen from flowers. It’s a kind of bee that makes nests within underground tunnels. They are extremely gentle and solitary bees that only live in spring.



8. Yellow-faced Bumble Bee, Bombus vosnesenskii (Apidae)

Yellow-faced Bumble Bee
Yellow-faced Bumble Bee

Bombus vosnesenskii, the yellow-faced bumblebee, is a bumblebee type native in the western part of North America. They are mostly black, with yellow-colored spots on their stomachs and faces. Bumblebees eat pollen and nectar that flowers produce.

Queens are massive, around 18-21 mm in length, and Drones measure between 10 and 15 millimeters long. Bumblebees with yellow faces usually reside in holes left by other animals, gaps in walls, stumps of trees and piles of stones.



9. Sweat bee, Halictus spp. (Halictidae)

Sweat Bee
Sweat Bee

Halictidae are among the six families of bees within the order Hymenoptera and are often referred to as sweat bees. Sweat bees consist of both non-metallic and metallic bees, and they are mostly dull to black metallic in appearance.

As with other bees, adults consume pollen and nectar and pollinate flowers as they go. Sweat bees are small in size, with sizes ranging between 0.125 up to 0.5 inches in height. The majority of sweat bees build nests in the ground or their habitats, such as clay soil and river banks; however, some are found in wood.

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